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The Lion, The Mouse and Everyone Else

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The title is taken from Aesop’s fable, ‘The lion and the mouse’. It suggests that there are those that are the strong and powerful, and those that are the small and marginalised, in society, but that there is also a third group – who are neither, nor really wish to be. In the extended wake of an economic crisis, a young government departmental worker returns to his family home in the countryside for the weekend to get away from the stress and chaos of the city. What he finds is very little has changed: each of his three sisters act as they always have done, giving him grief and laughter, rebuttals and support as each is wont to do, whilst his parent’s show they just appreciate having him home, even for just a short while. Family games are played, arguments ensue, and the values of humanity are debated, whilst nature plays it part in being the inevitable bringer of hope and despair.

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SKU: df008 Categories: , , , , ,
Product ID: 5708

Additional information

Author

Genre

Drama

Script Style

Full Length Play

Duration (mins)

50

Male Cast

2

Female Cast

4

Total Cast

6

Synopsis

The title is taken from Aesop’s fable, ‘The lion and the mouse’. It suggests that there are those that are the strong and powerful, and those that are the small and marginalised, in society, but that there is also a third group – who are neither, nor really wish to be. In the extended wake of an economic crisis, a young government departmental worker returns to his family home in the countryside for the weekend to get away from the stress and chaos of the city. What he finds is very little has changed: each of his three sisters act as they always have done, giving him grief and laughter, rebuttals and support as each is wont to do, whilst his parent’s show they just appreciate having him home, even for just a short while. Family games are played, arguments ensue, and the values of humanity are debated, whilst nature plays it part in being the inevitable bringer of hope and despair.

Cast

David, mid-20s: works for the government; slightly pretentious, smartly dressed.
Has become cynical over time, (the only way to get ahead in life, and not
wonder why? – can’t have regrets if you do as you wish) supports the recent
trip to China for economic gains. Cares about the state of the economy. Quite
lonely at times, though, in the big city.

Clara, 18: on her gap year. A real stern, theoretical, fighter of people’s freedom.
Has a real sardonic/deadpan tone to her. Believes in collective goals for
humanity – working together to ensure resources are sustained, and the best
interests of humanity as a whole are achieved. Easily stressed by situations,
and by that which she can’t change/influence herself. Therefore, can be quite
wrathful.

Tilly, 17, chipper, airy fairy, cheerful, hippy sort of girl. Likes helping people, reads
a lot for English. Insightful and friendly. Caring. Easy-going. Nonchalant.

Ted, 50s: The man of the house. Mechanic. Done it all his life. Enjoys the simple
things in life – mostly his wife’s company. Smarter than your average
mechanic.

Anne, 50s: The lady of the house. Cooks, cleans, sew, etc. Enjoys her life, and like
Ted, enjoys his company more than anything.

Lucy, 15: The youngest, and of the computer/mobile phone generation. A typical
moody and anti-social teenager. Attitude towards everything. Very crude at
times.

Sample

df08-s.pdf

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